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  1. #1
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    Aug 2009

    Smile The famous festival of Hinduism (Kali Puja)

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    she Goddess Kali Goddess of Time, Change
    Devanagari काली

    Tamil script காளி

    Affiliation Devi , Mahavidya , Matrika

    Abode Cremation grounds

    Mantra Om Krīm Kālyai namaḥ ,
    Om Kapālinaye Namah,
    Om Hrim Shrim Krim Parameshvari Kalike Svaha

    Weapon Sword

    Consort Shiva

    Mount Jackal


    Kali (Sanskrit: काली, Bengali:Kālī), also known as Kalika (Bengali:Kālikā), is a Hindu goddess associated with eternal energy. The name Kali means "black", but has by folk etymology come to mean "force of time (kala)". Despite her negative connotations, she is today considered the goddess of time and change. Although sometimes presented as dark and violent, her earliest incarnation as a figure of annihilation still has some influence. More complex Tantric beliefs sometimes extend her role so far as to be the "ultimate reality" or Brahman. She is also revered as Bhavatarini (literally "redeemer of the universe"). Comparatively recent devotional movements largely conceive Kali as a benevolent mother goddess.

    Kali is represented as the consort of god Shiva, on whose body she is often seen standing. She is associated with many other Hindu goddesses like Durga, Bhadrakali, Sati, Rudrani, Parvati and Chamunda. She is the foremost among the Dasa-Mahavidyas, ten fierce Tantric goddesses.

    Kālī is the feminine of kāla "black, dark coloured" (per Panini 4.1.42). In the Mundaka Upanishad Kali is mentioned as one of the seven tongues of Agni, the Rigvedic God of Fire (Mundaka Upanishad 2:4), thus giving rise to Kali's tongue, seen in images. It appears as the name of a form of Durga in the Mahabharata 4.195, and as the name of an evil female spirit in Harivamsa 11552.

    The homonymous kāla, "appointed time", which depending on context can mean "death", is distinct from kāla "black", but became associated with it through folk etymology. The association is seen in a passage from the Mahābhārata, depicting a female figure who carries away the spirits of slain warriors and animals. She is called kālarātri (which Thomas Coburn, a historian of Sanskrit Goddess literature, translates as "night of death") and also kālī (which, as Coburn notes, can be read here either as a proper name or as a description "the black one").

    Kali's association with blackness stands in contrast to her consort, Shiva, whose body is covered by the white ashes of the cremation ground (Sanskrit: śmaśāna) in which he meditates, and with which Kali is also associated, as śmaśāna-kālī.

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  2. #2
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    Apr 2009





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