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    Default Haunted Movie Music Review

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    There was a time when Vikram Bhatt's name was synonymous with good, pleasant and chartbuster music. This was a decade ago when soundtracks of films like Ghulam, Kasoor and Raaz had created a wave in quick succession and one looked forward to great music being amalgamated with involving storytelling. As Vikram's films slumped over a period of time, so did the music with an exception of Awara Paagal Deewana. However the famous Bhatt touch was missing there. There was a recovery of sorts in music of films like 1920 and Shaapit but frankly the old world charm was missing. No wonder, even though one is excited to check out what do composer Chirantan Bhatt and lyricist Junaid Wasi have to offer here, there is fair bit of apprehension that sets in as well.


    However, all apprehension fades away with 'Tum Ho Mera Pyar' bringing with it the kind of effervescence that one associates with an Emraan Hashmi number. Guest lyricist Shakeel Azmi spins words that are in line with what one is used to hearing in films coming from the house of Bhatts - whether Vikram, Mukesh or Mahesh - and hence a sense of familiarity sets in. A romantic number which is basically sung by K.K. with Suzanne chipping in the background as well, 'Tum Ho Mera Pyar' is a simple melody which takes the kind of route that never fails. A quintessential Bollywood track, it gives a good start to Haunted.

    The sound of piano that begins 'Jaaniya' has a trademark Bhatt sound to it, something that has enticed listeners for over a decade now. This one just picks up from where 'Tum Ho Mera Pyar' left and establishes pretty firmly that Haunted would be following a packaged approach of a soundtrack working as a whole rather than one single track driving the show. From this song on, it is lyricist Junaid Wasi who pens all the songs. Sidharth Basrur is a new voice who is introduced and the youngster does a good job in singing this number that has shades of soft rock to it.

    'Tera Hi Bas Hona Chaahoon' too opens in a manner which is expected of a Bhatt track and this time around the introduction of 'tabla' at the very beginning only makes the proceedings further interesting. Sung by Jojo and Najam Sheraz, 'Tera Hi Bas Hona Chaahoon' has a vociferous appeal to it and reminds of 'Tujhe Bhula Diya' [Anjaana Anjaani]. With a touch of Sufi element to it, the song is a passionate take on affairs though one waits to see how exactly it will be picturised and fitted into the film's narrative.

    Sidharth Basrur returns to the scene with and this time around the composition is even better with 'Mujhe De De Har Gham Tera' being a few notches ahead of 'Jaaniya'. There is a raw feel to Siddharth's voice that makes one hear it even more closely as it has a unique touch to it. The song has a good flow to it and turns out to be yet another track that would be gladly picked up by Emraan Hashmi. In fact it also reminds one of his 'Mahi' [Raaz - the Mystery Continues].

    Another newcomer who continues to leave an impression in each of his outings so far, whether 'Anjaana Anjaani Ki Kahani' [Anjaana Anjaani] or 'Main Jiyoonga' [Break Ke Baad], is Nikhil D'Souza who gets a solo for himself in the form of 'You're So Beautiful'. A love song which has a seamless flow to it while making one imagine a candle light dinner or a walk on the beach for a couple, 'You're So Beautiful' is the kind that could easily fit into a Valentine collection.

    Finally arrives a song which could actually be termed as the only situational song in Haunted. 'Sau Baras', as the title suggests, is about revisiting 'sadiyon puraani kahaani' and as expected, there is a haunting feel to it. Not that it is scary but then it isn't quite a kind of number that you would want to put on in night as it indeed carries an intrigue element. Tia Bajpai, the leading lady of the film, herself comes behind the mike to croon this one and though one can sense a rough edge here or there, she still goes about doing a decent job. Almost an unplugged number with barely an instrument or two in the background, 'Sau Baras' can be expected to play at various junctures in the film.


    As stated earlier, Haunted isn't the kind of album that has one single song standing out and making a massive impression at the stands. Also, there isn't an item number popping out of nowhere to add on to the commercial appeal of the album. Instead the album boasts of songs like 'Tum Ho Mera Pyar', 'Mujhe De De Har Gham Tera' and 'You're So Beautiful' amongst others that carry enough potential to keep the soundtrack of Haunted fluid. Boasting of vintage Bhatt touch, Haunted can pride itself on being a score that is worthy enough to be termed as the filmmaker's best since Raaz.

    ...being a human...



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