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  1. #1
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    Default Review: That Girl In Yellow Boots is edgy

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    I've always thought boots make a fascinating metaphor for struggle and survival.




    They walk through intense highs and extreme lows, into murky waters, above rugged paths. Not always above suspicion though, their darker side comes into play when the tough exterior of a sole tramples on soft, blameless grass. Nevertheless, they amble on, till the wear and tear of daily dirt and stressful challenges puts an end to their travels.

    Though That Girl in Yellow Boots, with its enigmatic title and sharp imagery, isn't always as reflective as I would have liked it to be, it is, ultimately, an Anurag Kashyap film, which amounts to a certain level of edge and blatancy. Known to push the envelope with his uncompromised vision around stark subjects without prioritizing the profit aspect, Kashyap commands respect among his colleagues, collaborators, critics and cinemagoers with good reason.



    Yellow Boots, co-written by him and wife Kalki Koechlin [ Images ], also essaying the 'Girl' in the title, is a compilation of abstract frames, which often stir from their surreal state to expose the ugly, upsetting corners of society. The narrative refuses, almost doggedly, to follow a conventional structure. Instead like fluttering pages of a disorderly diary, it is puzzling, self-indulgent, wandering and personal.

    For most part, TGIYB is about a British girl named Ruth (Koechlin) living in Mumbai [ Images ] and working at a shady massage parlour without a permit. Unlike the easy-to-fleece phirangs, one is accustomed to seeing in Bollywood films, Ruth is street-smart, speaks (and cusses) in broken Hindi and knows her way around red-tape India .




    Ruth would have probably endorsed the Janlokpal Bill, especially when you think about her numerous encounters with cantankerous sarkari hacks inside stuffy government offices juggling between lustful stares, proposed bribes (or donations like Ruth puts it) and gulps of Digene.

    Truth is it takes something more potent than a popular antacid to understand the psychology behind Ruth's strange rebellion and indistinct pursuit. An Osho enthusiast, she's overstaying her visit to India against her wary mother's wishes, learning Hindi and dating a crime-affiliated dope-addict, tackling his neurotic nemesis while earning an extra grand by giving handjobs to creepy massage clients; all because of an affection-filled, address-less letter from her estranged Indian father.

    For the longest time, Yellow Boots repeatedly goes over the script's key characteristics against Naren Chandavarkar, Suhaas Ahuja and Benedict Taylor's spellbinding score. Meanwhile, cinematographer Rajeev Ravi captures regular sights of Mumbai with such engrossment and relish; it's not long before you begin to see the extra in the ordinary.

    Sleekness alone, however, doesn't make a film. There's a lot about Yellow Boots that insists you bank on assumption because it strives on build-up. When the moment of truth arrives, while never as staggering, it is rather disconcerting.



    Other than presenting opportunities in Ruth's hunt for daddy, TGIYB often distracts itself with the parlour owner's (a pitch-perfect Puja Sarup) incessant telephonic babble or side-tracks to focus on the men she constantly interacts with -- the gutless, grisly boyfriend (Prashant Prakash), an emotionally-disturbed, Kannada-spewing gangster (Gulshan Devaiah), an influential bureaucrat (Shiv Subramanium) and Ruth's two faithful customers played by Naseeruddin Shah and Kumud Mishra. All these actors, Prakash and Devaiah in particular, impress with their unfailingly gritty and relentless portrayals.

    If I rely on reason, I'd say she's no damsel-in-distress but a voluntary freak with low self-worth and tendency to complicate life. If I believe Ruth, she's just young, needy and unapologetic about her choices or exploitations.
    Regardless of the ambiguity that shrouds Ruth, Kalki entrances you into liking Ruth. As the camera lovingly settles on her distinctly oval, unblemished face, complimenting her 'Julia Roberts-meet- Bugs Bunny' grin, you discover there's something intensely original about this actress beyond the obvious. She's raw, understated, unrestrained and uncorrupted. That Girl in Yellow Boots underscores her courage and charisma as an actress coming into her own.


    ...being a human...



  2. #2
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    Default Yellow Boots is my last film with Kalki'



    His new film, That Girl in Yellow Boots, stars his wife Kalki Koechlin in a powerful role of a foreigner who comes to India in search of her father. It was the headlines of the day that inspired the film, says Anurag.

    In the first part of the interview, Anurag talks to Shaikh Ayaz about his working relationship with Kalki, giving platform to young filmmakers and whether he's evolving as a writer and filmmaker:

    How did That Girl in Yellow Boots originate?

    It originated from various things, stuff that I read in the papers. A German girl who came to India and then another day, I read of a father raping his two daughters. So, those things stay with you and start bothering you. I discussed it with Kalki -- she was writing a play -- and I asked her if she will write it.

    She started writing it. What she did was brought in her own experience. She's a girl who's born in India, grew up here but is still looked at as a white girl. I would say it's a film that evolved over a period of time.

    Your title looks so similar to Juan Luis Bu uel's The Woman with Red Boots.

    It's a nice title, isn't it?

    How is it to collaborate with the person you are emotionally involved with?

    When I started collaborating with Kalki, I wasn't married to her.

    But to answer to your question, it's a joint effort because she brings a certain aspect to a script that I can't and vice versa. The thing is, after our marriage now, we are not even doing too many films. She's on her own, so am I. (Laughs) Okay, let me announce it to the world; this is our last film together.
    ...being a human...



  3. #3

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    Review: That Girl In Yellow Boots


    Anurag Kashyap’s That Girl in Yellow Boots is a movie which seeks to reveal the intricacies of everyday life in its natural colour. The movie is about Ruth (Kalki Koechlin), a British citizen, who comes to India with the sole motive of finding her father. Ruth eventually finds herself living in a dilapidated apartment with a drug dealer boyfriend who lives off her. She makes a living by working in a shady massage parlour, offering ‘happy endings’ to sleazy old men. Her every effort towards finding her father, whom she vaguely remembers, culminates in discovering darkest and terrible secrets.




    Still from That Girl In Yellow Boots




    An alien to the city, Ruth’s stay here is fraught with unending problems and misery. The story looks promising in the beginning, but slowly loses its essence as the movie unfolds. It loses all and any sense of reality somewhere in the middle, with Ruth struggling to make ends meet at one place and dishing out thousands of rupees to find her father and protect her lover at the same time. The movie is not very believable in this regard. Also the characters in the movie are played with a certain amount of intensity but do not develop as the story progresses.

    The title of the film is quite fun. The bright yellow boots stand out in a mundane environment just as Ruth stands out in the city of Mumbai putting across the whole concept of being out of place.

    Veteran actor, Nasseerudin Shah has outdone himself once again. He’s a father figure to Ruth who visits her at the parlour for treatment to a painful leg ailment. Chittiapa (Gulshan Devaiah), a gangster who threatens Ruth when her boyfriend (Prashant Prakash) runs away with his money, and Maya (Puja Swarup), the receptionist at Ruth’s parlour provide comic relief to the otherwise heavy script. Anurag Kashyup’s cinematography is admirable. Most of the scenes are shot in natural light and on the city’s roads.

    As for the background score, composer Naren Chandavarkar has made sure it supports and adds life to the script.

    The film rather ends on an abrupt note and the climax isn’t a surprise but it is disturbing.

    Watch only if you’re in the mood for something not run-of-the-mill.



    Rating: 2.5/5

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    thx for information

    edit :- http://www.desirulez.net/showthread.php?t=554743

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    Director Anurag Kashyap has always managed to be something different, new and meaningful when it comes to the stories of his movies. His movies are dark, broody and psychological anxiety in form and meaning. The Bollywood helmer's latest movie That Girl in Yellow Boots is not an exception. It is a fine specimen of his style of filmmaking. It is an artistic and wholesome experience.



    That Girl in Yellow Boots is a tragic tale of British girl, who has come to India in search of her estranged father. The movie has been superbly crafted and wonderfully acted. It is a dark, dismal and desperate portrait of life inside Mumbai, where Ruth hopes to find salvation and a father. The movie also throws light on incest and sexual abuse, which have become an intrinsic part of our society.

    Ruth (Kalki Koechlin) is a girl from England and has come to Mumbai to find her Indian father, who abandoned her family when she was a kid. She is without a work permit, which drives her to work at a massage parlour. She starts dating a drug addict Prashant (Prashant Prakash). A city that feeds on her misery, a love that eludes her and above all, a devastating truth that she must encounter. And everyone wants a piece of her. Will she find her father or not? This will be answered in the climax.

    As Ruth, Kalki has delivered a wonderful performance and she has lived up to the expectations of her role. Naseeruddin Shah, Prashant and Gulshan have also added a lot of depth and conviction to their characters. Naren Chandavarkar and Benedict Taylor's music, Rajeev Ravi's cinematography and Shweta Venkat Mathew's editing also commendable.
    ...being a human...



 

 

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