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Thread: Best of alaska

  1. #1
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    At 20,320 feet, Mt. McKinley (or Denali) is the highest point in North America. But it's actually the tallest mountain on the planet, if you measure from bottom to top (Everest, on the Tibetan Plateau, is like a little kid standing on a chair). Forests grow on glaciers, rock spires twist like unicorn horns. The best way to see the mountain is from a small plane—board in Talkeetna, the town that inspired the TV show Northern Exposure. Or, do like the locals: grab a tent and a seat on the old school bus, and bump out to Wonder Lake Campground, the end of the road in Denali National Park. From there, the mountain looks like a wall across the horizon. Best meal in Alaska: grab some smoked salmon, an Alaskan Amber, and have a picnic facing the mountain.

    Picnic on the Mountain



    Maybe it's just because of the name, but for glaciers, most people hit Glacier Bay. Alaskans, however, take visiting relatives to Tracy Arm, just south of Juneau, which is more intimate and much less traveled. Seals bask on floes, the glacier cracks like thunder, and shopping center-sized chunks of ice prove gravity always wins. If the tides are right, a side trip into the nearby but almost inaccessible Ford's Terror takes you into a landscape that looks like it belongs in a dinosaur movie, when the world was very new.

    Glaciers of Tracy Arm



    Think of the Iditarod as the world's longest game of fetch. It starts in Anchorage at the end of the Fur Rendezvous—a weeklong bash with everything from snowshoe softball to fireworks that compete with the early March northern lights. Then a couple dozen mushers and a few hundred dogs get the idea that they'd like to be over 1,000 miles away in Nome… and so the race begins. The dogs try to fetch the horizon line, across Alaska's wildest territory. Despite nearly 24-hour darkness, rampaging moose, frozen rivers, and temperatures cold enough to make car tires freeze, the fastest teams arrive in Nome, on the shores of the Bering Sea, in just a week. The humans look pretty tired, but the dogs are still wagging their tails.

    Fur Rendezvous and Iditarod



    Anglers who spend enough time in Alaska usually refuse to fish Down South. "Why bother? You just catch things the size of bait." To combine the fishing with a good night's sleep, head to Favorite Bay Lodge, on Admiralty Island. Admiralty itself is one of the state's most pristine islands—the bears outnumber the people by more than two to one. But for the angler, the attractions are all wet: 80-pound salmon, 300-pound halibut, and cod the size of coffee tables. Or take a fly into one of the nearby lakes and try to beat the state record of a 40-pound trout.

    Favorite Bay Lodge



    Take Anchorage and Fairbanks out of the equation, and Alaska's population density is less than one person per square mile. That means to really experience a night in Alaska, you need to do it on your own, in the middle of nowhere. Forest Service Cabins dot the entire state, most of them accessible only by charter boat or plane. Sure they're rustic—four walls, a roof, and a cookstove, plus some platforms for bring-it-yourself bedding—but the views are invariably astounding, and is there anything more amazing than waking up and knowing you won't hear a single other person today?

    Forest Service Cabins



    Distance in coastal Alaska isn't measured by miles, but by how long it takes to get somewhere in a boat. So the boat might as well be comfortable. Charter 73 feet of comfort from Alaska Yacht Charters, and use the ship to experience the Alaska few ever see: tiny, still inlets where bears overturn rocks while looking for sculpins, bald eagles flying across a horizon filled with a volcanic cone… your own private Alaska, afloat.

    Alaska Yacht Charters



    The Chugach Mountains look like a barrier separating Anchorage from the rest of the state. To get a peek over the top, head to Seven Glaciers Restaurant on a tram from Alyeska Ski Resort. The view stretches to the curve of the earth, over the deep blues of glacial ice and the slate blue of Cook Inlet. Dine on the freshest, best prepared ingredients Alaska has to offer, whether it's seafood or game (if moose is on the menu, you'll never go back to beef).

    Seven Glaciers Restaurant



  2. #2
    dR Rockers www.desirulez.net
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  3. #3
    Retired Staff www.desirulez.net
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    looks like a paradise...
    thnx



  4. #4
    Retired Staff www.desirulez.net
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    cool

  5. #5
    The Creator :) www.desirulez.org
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    yeah that place is alwayz cool nothing new bhavik






  6. #6
    |ℓινє ☮|ℓσνє ❤|ℓαυgн ☺| www.desirulez.net
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    razi









 

 

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